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Anas Aremeyaw Anas investigates the ritual killings of Ghanaian children deemed to be possessed by evil spirits.

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Every year an unknown number of children - most of them disabled in some way - are murdered in northern Ghana because of the belief that they are in some way possessed by evil spirits set on bringing ill fortune to those around them.

The practice is the consequence of ancient traditions and customs and is shaped by poverty and ignorance in remote and often marginalised communities. No one knows the exact number of these ritual deaths across Ghana, Benin, Burkina Faso and parts of Nigeria, but some believe it could be in the thousands.

For years, NGOs and the Ghanaian authorities have tried advocacy and education in an attempt to eradicate the practice but with only marginal success. Well into the 21st century, Ghana's so-called spirit children are still being killed because they carry the blame for the misfortunes of everyday life.

In 2013, award-winning Ghanaian investigative reporter Anas Aremeyaw Anas set out to track down and expose some of those responsible for the senseless killings - determined to bring them to justice and stop the practice.

Back then, he wrote: "When I first heard about this I could not believe it was happening in my country in the 21st century ... The practice originally emerged as a way for poor families to deal with deformed or disabled children that they cannot look after. These families approach village elders known as concoction men and inform them that they suspect their child to be a so-called spirit child.

The concoction man then takes the father of the child to visit a soothsayer who confirms whether or not the child is truly evil, without ever actually laying eyes on them. Once this confirmation has been received, the concoction man brews a poisonous liquid from local roots and herbs and force-feeds it to the child, almost always resulting in death.

Over time, this practice has become a perceived solution to any problems a family might be having at the time of a child's birth. By blaming the child for sickness in the family, or the father's inability to find work or provide money to support his dependants, these communities have found an otherworldly explanation for their problems ... But infanticide has always been a crime against humanity."

Now, five years later, Anas, spoke to REWIND about why he doesn't want to show his identity, the dangers of undercover journalism in Africa, and what has become of the concoction men that killed those children.

"Most African journalists who do investigations have a series of dangers pointing at them. You just have to be yourself and think about how to survive. I came up with the beads that I wear, so people don't see my face. I'm sure that some of my colleagues, in Nigeria or Malawi have other ways to protect themselves," Anas told Al Jazeera.

Talking about the threats facing investigative journalists, he said: "Generally, people definitely want to point guns at you or some will try to kidnap you. And most of these things have happened; getting death threats and legal suits is normal, most of my colleagues in the continent suffer that."

"There is nothing more frustrating than doing a story on someone and then walking on the same streets with that person. It is even more dangerous and that can easily end the life of any journalist."
 
"We don't make stories so that people can just read them and smile in their bedrooms. We make stories that have impact on the society. For me, it is a good story when the bad guy is named, shamed and put in jail ... Many people have gone to jail as a result of my work and I'm proud of it."

Anas also talked about the concoction men that he met during his Spirit Child investigation.

"A legal process was started but they were too old, so at the time that the process could finish, some of them couldn't even make it to court. But the key thing that happened in that story is that it told the community that whoever you are, when you attempt to do some of these things, you are going behind bars."

"For the first time, those witch doctors were arrested and put before court. That sends a strong signal to all witch doctors to be careful, that when you are dealing with the life of a child it's a completely different matter. And we can't sit down for these children to be killed in the way they are being killed."

Read more: https://www.aljazeera.com/programmes/rewind/2018/05/spirit-child-ritual-killings-ghana-180527084642891.html